With the end of the year finally here, I know I could do yet another post on the OSHA vax-or-test standard given that the Supreme Court on Wednesday announced expedited oral arguments on the legality of that rule and the vaccine mandate for healthcare workers. That’s now scheduled for January 7, 2022.

But really, with

Last week, along with my colleagues Lisa Zana and Robert Grady, I presented to the Association of Corporate Counsel group from Westchester County and Southern Connecticut on Returning to the Office.

Of course, it’s still premature.  The COVID-19 cases in Connecticut and New York are among the highest in the nation. While vaccinations continue to

Remember 2010?

Those were the days of Lady Gaga’s “Meat Dress”. You could also play “Angry Birds” on your new smartphone.

And discrimination complaints to the EEOC were about at their all-time high.

But over the last few years — and in particular, last year — discrimination and retaliation claims have been down.

A LOT.

Back in the 1990s, employers still had the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas hearings and the tawdry sexual harassment allegations relatively fresh on their minds. Employment lawyers will tell you that they started to see a bump up in claims in the early to mid 1990s as the issues of workplace harassment raised to the surface.

I

Rainbow over Hartford
Are Things Getting Better or Worse?

The last few weeks it seems that I’ve been reading about sexual harassment in the workplace issues a lot more. Here are a few examples:

The Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities released a new set of statistics yesterday (my thanks to CHRO liaison James O’Neill for the update which I had requested a while back).  Unlike years past, the statistics this year show some dramatic changes; those changes should have a significant impact on how employers view the agency