Last week, I deleted the Twitter app off my iPhone as a bit of an experiment.  I’ve done this a few times before — but the start of the pandemic back in early 2020 had me going full on Twitter since then.  After all, if it’s important, it’s on Twitter, right?

Well, not exactly.  In fact, when I was sick for a few days, I kept turning to Twitter and finding…not much that merited the visit to the app — just boredom.  (Never fear though, I can still access it on my computer browser.)  Nevertheless, I wondered how much I’d miss if I just took it of my phone.

The first real answer came on Friday when news came of the Fifth Circuit’s beatdown decision to stay enforcement of the OSHA vax or test Emergency Temporary Standard.  Turns out you can hear about it the same time as others even without being on Twitter.

But what happened next was interesting for me — nothing. Without being on Twitter, I missed the immediate reactions, overreactions, snark, and, sure, some actual insights.

And that’s ok.

We are entering a time during this pandemic when the changes are happening more incrementally and slowly.  Perhaps we are headed for a modest 5th wave here, for example.  That might require employers to adjust on the fly again.  But speed isn’t everything right now.

Thus, with the luxury of a few more days to ponder and think, where are we now on the OSHA rule?
Continue Reading Court Stays OSHA ETS, But We Know All Too Well It’s Not the Last Word

Being sick over the last week brought me a lot of unexpected “gifts”.  Sure, there were the forced afternoon naps (oh, who’s kidding, even a morning nap too) .  The watching of “The Price is Right” at least once (or was it twice?). The early start of a post-pandemic diet.

But also the “gift” of

Over the weekend, I was joking with a friend that we’ve seen more changes in employment law in the last 18 months than the last 18 years.

That’s an exaggeration of course. But it certainly does feel like there’s been a lot of changes. Sometimes it’s hard to catch up. So rather than a long

With the Delta variant continuing to surge throughout the country, employers have begun to seriously consider mandatory vaccination policies.  As I mentioned before, on September 9th, we presented a webinar on the topic.

But shortly after our webinar, the Biden Administration released a COVID-19 Action Plan which combines executive orders with forthcoming

Earlier today, my colleagues and I gave a webinar on mandatory vaccination policies. It’s almost like the President was listening.

This afternoon, President Biden announced that the Department of Labor, and specifically, OSHA will be issuing a new rule that will require all employers with 100 or more employees to ensure their workforce is fully

As the Delta variant continues make its presence known, more employers are continuing to explore mandatory vaccination policies for their staff.  This comes on the heels of Governor Lamont’s executive order that requires teachers and others to be vaccinated against COVID-19 or submit to weekly testing.

My colleagues and I have been fielding questions on

As to the workplace and the pandemic, what now?  It’s a question I’ve posed before, but each time, there’s something new on the horizon.

There a lot of uncertainty. Adding to the uncertainty, is the near certainty that the Delta variant will start making more of an impact in this area.

Already, we are seeing

On Tuesday afternoon, Governor Lamont issued new Executive Order 12 updating the mask guidance that the state has been operating under since way back in Executive Order 7NNN on August 14, 2020 (and Executive Order 7BB on April 17, 2020 before that).  The new guidance skews closer to the CDC guidance that we talked about