Three years ago, I floated the idea that perhaps an agency could come up with a modest “amnesty” program that would give employers a chance to get into compliance with FLSA laws, without facing the draconian consequences such an admission might entail.

Now, late yesterday, the United States Department of Labor announced its own pilot

  • You have your bread. And milk.  Presumably eggs too.  (Anyone making French Toast this morning?)
  • But do you know the employment law rules that apply for winter storms and classic nor’easters like we have today?
  • I’ve written about it plenty before, but here are three issues you may not have thought about recently.
  1. Reporting Time

There is news in the employment law world beyond sexual harassment.  Arbitration clauses to be exact.

Yesterday, the Second Circuit issued a small, but important decision for employers that will continue to limit FLSA wage & hour claims.

The court ruled that an employee’s FLSA claims in court were barred by the arbitration clause contained

It never seems to fail; I go on vacation and the Connecticut Supreme Court issues one of the few employment law decisions it issues every year during that week.

Fortunately for all of us, it concerns the fluctuating work week method of overtime computation which most employers in the state consciously either avoid or try

Continuing a look back at some “basics” posts you might have missed, back in 2009, I tackled an exemption that may be overlooked when it comes to employment laws.  

Connecticut has a proud history of farms. Many, like Lyman Orchards, have been passed down for many generations. (And if you’ve never visited Lyman Orchards,

Photo Courtesy Library of Congress c. 1943
Photo Courtesy Library of Congress c. 1943

It’s hard getting excited about joint employment.

In fact, it’s pretty yawn-inducing.  (Seriously, get a cup of coffee before reading this.)

But a few weeks back, the Department of Labor issued some new guidance on the topic that has been making the rounds

You might need a calculator
You might need a calculator

For yet another year, Connecticut’s minimum wage is on the increase.

Effective January 1, 2016, the Connecticut minimum wage will be raised to $9.60 per hour effective January 1, 2016.

Although the federal minimum wage is $7.25, Connecticut employers must pay the higher rate under state