It’s not often that we have to provide day-to-day updates on the status of the United States Department of Labor rule that raises salary thresholds for overtime exemptions, but here we are.

My colleague, Sarah Westby, posted an update yesterday on a major case from Texas in which the state challenged the rule. Late last

Does the Connecticut Fair Employment Practices Act (CFEPA) include claims of associational discrimination based on an employee’s association with a disabled individual?

That was the issue before the Connecticut Appellate Court in Demarco v. Charter Oak Temple Restoration Assn., Inc. decided yesterday.

The Court held that Conn. Gen. Stat. § 46a-60 (b) (1) of CFEPA

As I discussed in prior posts (here), the Senate on Monday approved a bill that will greatly expand the paid sick day law to large and small employers alike. Since it was previously approved by the House, it now goes to the Governor for his signature; he has previously indicated his willingness to

If you had April 23, 2024 as the biggest day in employment law of the year on your bingo card, congratulations. You won. Hands down.

Yesterday was such a blockbuster of a day, it’s hard to wrap your head around it. (My partner Sarah Westby and I have tried, and have summarized the results on

Tomorrow, the EEOC is expected to publish its final regulations for the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act. They were previewed in a press release earlier this week.

Since nearly every lawfirm is producing their own summary of what are, in my view, fairly straightforward implementation regulations, this post will take a different tact — namely how

When you’re sick with a cold, you end up having some time to read and I came across a recent study of hiring practices of about 100 of the largest companies nationwide.

Published by the National Bureau of Economic Research, researchers sent 80,000 résumés to 10,000 jobs from 2019 to 2021. Ultimately, the authors found

Earlier this week, Governor Ned Lamont issued a press release supporting Senate Bill 12 which would dramatically expand the scope of the state’s current Paid Sick Leave law.

Currently, Paid Sick Leave is available to “service workers” at certain employers with 50 or more employees. Passed in 2011, the law requires that these workers receive

It’s March and things are heating up at the General Assembly so let’s get right at the bills that employers should be aware of.

Senate Bill 4 — which is deemed to be a Senate caucus priority bill, and thus something employers should pay attention to — redefines discrimination in a way that has never