The Connecticut General Assembly is already busy with a full compliment of employment law bills under consideration.  At this point, it seems likely that several will pass in one form or another and thus employers should be playing close attention to the developments.

Here are a few of the Senate ones that I’m watching (

The Connecticut General Assembly is back at work so it’s time to take a quick peek to see what’s percolating.

2013 Legislative Session Begins

The Connecticut Business and Industry Association highlighted the “captive audience” bill as bill that is resurfacing, even though the Attorney General has previously raised doubts about

What a difference a few weeks can bring.

Back on May 5th, Attorney General George Jepsen issued a letter to legislators expressing his support of the so-called "captive-audience" bill.  That letter was used in the debate by Connecticut House members as proof that the bill would pass a legal challenge.  Indeed, on May 11th, the

Last night, after many hours of debate, the Connecticut House passed the so-called "captive audience" bill that would prohibit employers from requiring their workers to attend meetings concerning views on politics and religion.

But the truth is the bill (H.B. 5460) is really about one thing: prohibiting employers from talking about unions when a vote on

The Connecticut General Assembly is in full swing with the budget dominating the discussion. But expect to hear of several high-profile bills continuing to make their way through the legislature. 

Here is a brief update on a few of them:

With the legislative session ending on Wednesday at midnight, there’s a lot for employers to keep an eye out. Here’s a quick summary of what’s still alive and what’s not, at the Connecticut General Assembly.

  • Senate Bill 365 (S.B. 365) – A bill that would prohibit so-called captive audience meetings by employers (typically regarding a