cgaOver the next week or so, I’ll be providing updates on various bills to pass (or fail) at the state general assembly.  They’re coming in fast and furious so patience is the order of the day.

But as we review various bills, there are employment-related aspects in places that you might not think. The first

Retired Justice Harper at last night's event
Retired Justice Harper at CBA event

Last night, I had the opportunity to attend the Connecticut Bar Association’s awards dinner — titled, “Celebrate with the Stars”. It was a lovely event filled with accolades for some of the state’s best and brightest in the legal profession and beyond.

Yeah yeah, I

Instagram_Icon_LargeOn Thursday, February 26th, I’ll be speaking on a panel discussion for the Connecticut Bar Association, Young Lawyers Section discussing the legal considerations of social media.

The topic covers how the evolving world of new social media is constantly churning up interesting legal issues and problems. The panel will present insights on some of the

In the July/August issue of the Connecticut Lawyer magazine, attorney Joseph Blyskal has the first of a two-part article on the state of restrictive covenants in employment agreements in Connecticut.  I’ve talked about this several times before (most recently earlier this summer), but the Connecticut Lawyer article is recommended reading as well (it’s behind a

Collins, left, addresses CBA; Shipman & Goodwin Partner Gabe Jiran, right, moderates.

At Monday’s Connecticut Legal Conference, CHRO Chair Gary Collins spoke for a bit about the developments at the oft-maligned agency since he’s come on board.  (You can follow all the tweets from the conference on Twitter using #ctlegalconf as

The Connecticut Legal Conference on Monday (produced by the Connecticut Bar Association) had several noteworthy programs, including a few on labor & employment law.  In today’s post, I’m going to recap the presentation by David Lopez, the current EEOC General Counsel.   He talked about the Top 10 Developments in EEOC Litigation over the last few

Next week, one of my colleagues, Peter Murphy will be at the Connecticut Bar Association to present a program entitled “CHRO 101 – From Complaint to Public Hearing”.   Full details are available at the CBA website.

The program includes a discussion of

  • The Complaint Process, MAR (Merit Assessment Review), and Mandatory Mediation,
  • Responding to the

This afternoon, I’ll be speaking to the Connecticut Bar Association’s Annual Meeting on a topic that is familiar to blog readers: The Intersection of Employment Law and Social Media.

If you’re attending, please stop by to say hi.

There are a few resources that I’ll discuss in the presentation that I would recommend here:

  • First,

Following up on her post last week recapping part of the Connecticut Bar Association’s Annual Meeting on labor laws, Guest Poster Rita Trivedi is back with highlights from administrative law and employment law portions of the presentation.

Again, my sincere thanks to her for this insightful post. I hope you all find it as interesting as I do.

In my last guest post, I highlighted some of the labor law developments discussed at the Connecticut Bar Association’s Annual Meeting on June 11. But administrative and employment law was certainly not neglected: attendees heard from representatives at the state Department of Labor and the Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities, giving practitioners a peek into issues to watch in the coming months. Highlights below….

The state FMLA should be an active topic in the coming year:

  • Watch for a ruling soon from the Connecticut Supreme Court in Velez v. Mayfield, Commissioner of Labor. Velez should answer the question of how to count employees under the Connecticut state FMLA: must the 75+ employees needed to determine if an employer is covered be solely in Connecticut, or in Connecticut and out of state? The state DOL has long held that the 75 must be only within Connecticut; the complaint alleges that both in- and out-of-state employees should be counted so as to prevent large employers from escaping coverage. Will this change? The results will affect case assessments for employee and employer-side attorneys alike.

    Continue Reading