Late on Friday, March 13, 2020, the Connecticut Department of Labor issued new FAQ for employees and employers dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic.

Some of this may be repetitive of what I and others have posted before, but I thought it would be helpful to provide both a link to the materials but also some

As Connecticut reported it’s first known COVID-19 cases over the weekend, it is becoming apparent that the time for preparation for a pandemic is starting to end, and the time for action items is beginning.

To that end, it seems that nearly every lawfirm is starting to compile answers to some frequently asked questions.

For

With talk of a pandemic of the COVID-19 illness (coronavirus) becoming more prevalent and advice from professionals that we ought to start preparing now, I thought I’d use this new installment of the Employment Law Checklist Project (#emplawchecklist) to review Connecticut’s existing laws and how those laws might impact employers.

Connecticut has an entire section

On Friday, I presented a program on “Paid FMLA: Does It Leave You Confused?” at my firm’s semi-annual Labor & Employment Law Seminar, along with my Shipman & Goodwin colleague Chris Neary.

Suffice to say that while the pun was well received, we had a number of attendees who left the seminar understanding that the

Late Friday, the House passed the Paid Family and Medical Leave Act bill that passed the Senate earlier in May.  Governor Lamont has indicated that he will sign the measure. As such, big changes are coming, though some of the biggest changes are are still a few years off.

You can review the bill here

The Connecticut Appellate Court has an interesting case coming out officially early next week about an employer’s obligations to provide leave as a “reasonable accommodation”. You can download Barbabosa v. Board of Education here.

In it, the Court concludes that when attendance is an essential function of the job (as it will be for most

It seems likely that some type of paid Family and Medical Leave (otherwise known as “Paid FMLA”) bill is going to pass the General Assembly.

CBIA recently posted about the pitfalls that await employers with passage with one CBIA staff testifying that “small businesses are terrified of this proposal.”  

But the “paid” aspect of the

Update August 16th: Late yesterday, I received further confirmation that the provisions regarding FMLA were withdrawn entirely from the proposed Democrat-led budget bill. Moreover, the General Assembly early this morning voted on a Republican version of the budget implementer, which now goes on to Governor Malloy (who has indicated he will veto the bill). That