file101235857424For the last six years, you haven’t seen much on this blog about changes to federal employment laws because, well, there just weren’t any.  What we DID see, however, were changes to regulations and enforcement orders.

Nearly six months into the new Trump administration, we’re now starting to see significant shifts in the federal regulatory

Photo Courtesy Library of Congress c. 1943
Photo Courtesy Library of Congress c. 1943

It’s hard getting excited about joint employment.

In fact, it’s pretty yawn-inducing.  (Seriously, get a cup of coffee before reading this.)

But a few weeks back, the Department of Labor issued some new guidance on the topic that has been making the rounds

HallofFame200pxV32007 seems like yesterday.

And yet, eight years after I started this blog and over 1800 posts later (and a Hall of Fame entry), I’m pretty sure 2007 WASN’T yesterday.

So for this year’s anniversary post, I thought I would capture what I think are some of the biggest storylines from the last eight years. 

My colleague, Jarad Lucan, who has been busy with his own labor cases, today returns with post about the latest from the NLRB.  There are many posts out there on the subject (here, here, and here, for example), so Jarad is going to touch on its impact for Connecticut employers.  

Lucan_J_WebAs you’ve no

Can an employee work for more than one employer at the same time? Under a theory of law called “joint employment”, the answer is yes.

But how do you make that determination?

Suppose a private bus company provides services all over Connecticut. It’s largest customer happens to be a very large private university in the