The timing for employers (which is basically any private business) to register with the state for the new Paid Family Medical Leave program couldn’t be worse or better, depending on your perspective.  It started November 1, 2020 and continues to run.

In just six weeks, employers will be required to start withholding .5% of a

13 years ago this week, I started this blog. But rather than dwell on another anniversary (and six months since working from home), I’d rather spend the time hitting a few (ok, 13) items in employment law because have been quite a few developments.

  1. Governor Lamont issued new Executive Orders this week amending the travel

You may recall a few weeks back that a federal court struck down portions of the USDOL regulations interpreting the Famlies First Coronavirus Response Act.

The open question at the time: What would the DOL do?

Late Friday, we got our answer — revised regulations designed to overcome the judicial concerns or, challenge the

If you recall way back in March, Governor Ned Lamont declared a civil preparedness and public health emergency which granted his office broad powers.  Those powers have been seen with various Executive Orders that have followed.

That declaration was set to expire today, September 9th.

However, a few days ago, the Governor issued a new

As employers start to return employees to the physical workplace, new issues keep arising daily.  Here’s a common scenario:

Employee X has been on furlough since late March and collecting more on unemployment than if he had been employed, thanks to the extra $600 weekly payment.

Employer now asks Employee to return to work.  Although

When no one is working, no one needs to get paid leave.

But as the workforce starts returning, smaller businesses — particularly those will less than 50 employees — are starting to feel the impact of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA).

That law created two new paid leave provisions — the EPSLA and

The United States Department of Labor recently updated its guidance on the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (EPSLA) and Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (FMLA+).

My colleagues at Shipman & Goodwin recapped the new guidance here.

One of the key takeaways from is that under the USDOL’s prior guidance and regulations, it

Just another day in employment law. Wednesday afternoon, the Department of Labor issued new regulations that further expand what was previously known about the paid leave provisions of the EPSLA and the EFMLEA.

You can view the regulations here.    They go into effect immediately.

The regulations are lengthy and we’ll have a full recap on

On Tuesday at noon, my colleagues and I are holding a video webinar on practical tips for employers dealing with the COVID-19 crisis now and in the near future.  The program will have a national outlook but we’ll hit on a few state specific resources.

The webinar is free to register HERE, though already

Today I had the opportunity to talk with a old friend in Spain via FaceTime. We hadn’t talked in months, but I’m sure like a lot of you, this pandemic has a way of bringing us together.

The same concerns that we have in Connecticut and the same issues we face are being addressed around