In yesterday’s post, I talked about the basics of what is and is not “sexual harassment”.

Continuing the theme of going back to the basics, employers in the Constitution State have certain posting and training requirements that must be followed.

These requirements are found in the administrative regulations set up by the CHRO regarding sexual

It’s been a crazy week here for reasons I hope to share in a future post.

But in the meantime, the world of employment law still continues. Here are some items worth reading that I had hoped to talk about further. This brief recap will have to do for now.

  • Want some tips on how

In prior posts, I’ve talked about the fluctuating work week and how it can be a useful tool for employers in limited circumstances. 

You might need a calculator

Yesterday, a federal court in Connecticut had a very interesting ruling that addressed whether an employer — when faced with a suit for

There are three major “white-collar” exemptions to the federal overtime rules that are, to some employers, a bit confusing to say the least.  One of them — the “executive” exemption — is mistakenly understood to just include, well, senior executives of a company.

A new case out by the Second Circuit (Ramos v. Baldor

The Second Circuit has long held that supervisors cannot be sued in their individual capacity under Title VII.  But can an employee do an end run around that by arguing that the supervisor is the “alter ego” of the company?

Well a few federal courts outside Connecticut have said that under the “alter ego” doctrine,

Consider this scenario.

An administrative assistant who’s been working solidly for the company for two years comes to you, as an HR manager, and says she’s been harassed by a manager over her looks. 

You need to talk with manager about the allegations.

What do you do? 

That’s the scenario posed in a recent article posted