Earlier this month, I posted on a bill pending before the Connecticut General Assembly that would have changed the statute of limitations for filing employment discrimination claims and allowed a Complainant to ask for a release of jurisdiction of the CHRO as soon as possible.

This week, the Labor & Public Employee Committee approved of

"Progressive Discipline" is a policy or practice that, over the years, has fallen out of favor with some employers.

What is it? It’s a practice — found also in some collective bargaining agreements — that typically provides a multi-step disciplinary process for many employment policy violations: a verbal warning, a written warning, a suspension, and

With the dog days of summer in full force here in Connecticut ("it’s the heat AND the humidity"), it seemed an appropriate time to roll out another installment of the "Quick Hits" feature to touch on a few items you might have missed over the last week or so:

  • One of the biggest stories

In a hearing earlier today, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission discussed the "devastating impact" that age discrimination has on workplaces and employees.

For employers, however, the most notable item from the hearing was the release of new technical guidance regarding separation agreements and the waivers of age discrimination claims contained in such agreements.  You can

Tell the truth. Be consistent.

Those are common refrains among lawyers to clients. Why? Because inconsistencies are a crucial way for opposing parties to establish their case.

In employment cases, an employee may not have "direct" evidence of discrimination, but courts allow an employee to piece together evidence based on circumstances, including evidence that

The slow season of employment law news continues, which makes this a perfect time to roll-out the occasional Quick Takes post to discuss interesting nuggets and updates to recent posts.