With the dog days of summer in full force here in Connecticut ("it’s the heat AND the humidity"), it seemed an appropriate time to roll out another installment of the "Quick Hits" feature to touch on a few items you might have missed over the last week or so:

  • One of the biggest stories

In a hearing earlier today, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission discussed the "devastating impact" that age discrimination has on workplaces and employees.

For employers, however, the most notable item from the hearing was the release of new technical guidance regarding separation agreements and the waivers of age discrimination claims contained in such agreements.  You can

Tell the truth. Be consistent.

Those are common refrains among lawyers to clients. Why? Because inconsistencies are a crucial way for opposing parties to establish their case.

In employment cases, an employee may not have "direct" evidence of discrimination, but courts allow an employee to piece together evidence based on circumstances, including evidence that

The slow season of employment law news continues, which makes this a perfect time to roll-out the occasional Quick Takes post to discuss interesting nuggets and updates to recent posts.

The U.S. Supreme Court today agreed to hear the case of Gross v. FBL Financial Services. Inc. putting the issue of "Whether a plaintiff must present direct evidence of discrimination in order to obtain a mixed-motive instruction in a non-Title VII discrimination case" squarely before the court (H/T ScotusBlog).

The case, arising out of a

In this blog, I often focus on the substantive law prohibiting discrimination cases, such as those courtesy morgue file - "mailbox"under ADEA.  But a case decided late last week demonstrates the importance of making sure that employees follow the procedural requirements required by law under anti-discrimination provisions..

In Cassotto v. Potter (D.Conn, Oct. 21, 2008) (Hall, J.) (download here)

The U.S. Supreme Court today, in Gomez-Perez v. Potter, ruled 6-3, that the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) protects federal workers from retaliation based on age-related complaints. 

The majority decision, written by Justice Alito, essentially grants protection to those federal workers on the same terms that private workers have long had. In doing