Tomorrow, the EEOC is expected to publish its final regulations for the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act. They were previewed in a press release earlier this week.

Since nearly every lawfirm is producing their own summary of what are, in my view, fairly straightforward implementation regulations, this post will take a different tact — namely how

Last week, Law360 quoted me in an article on marital status discrimination. (They timed it for Valentine’s Day; make of that what you will.)

The gist of the article is that marital status discrimination is something for employers to be mindful of.

And for that premise, I’m in agreement. Several states, including Connecticut, explicitly

Led, in part, by a crusade from former Fox News hosts Gretchen Carlson and Julie Roginsky, who settled private cases with Fox News involving sexual harassment and signed non-disclosure agreements (NDAs), we’re likely to see a bill at the General Assembly this year to ban employers’ use of NDAs and non-disparagement agreements in discrimination complaints.

Back in 2021, a change to the state’s unemployment compensation law might have been overlooked. After all, the provisions didn’t go into effect until January 1, 2024.

Alas, the time is now for employers to pay attention.

The state Department of Labor has a whole list of all the changes going into effect but I

As I continue my examination of some of the programs arising from the ABA Labor & Employment Conference held earlier this month in Seattle, one of the more notable topics was addressing wage & hour laws with employees now working across the country.

The great reshuffle has had a significant impact in the workplace since

For HR professionals and employment lawyers, the basics of FMLA and ADA is an oft-covered topic in law firm webinars.

But I’ve heard from plenty of people that they’re good with the basics; it’s the tricky issues that give them headaches.

With the acknowledgement that one person’s difficult question may be another person’s easy one

Back in June, when the state minimum wage increased to $15 an hour, I warned that because the minimum wage was now tied to the employment cost index for wages and salaries for all civilian workers — as defined by the United States Department of Labor — it was likely to go up effective January

In prior posts, I’ve talked about the difficulty for employers in getting a motion for summary judgment granted in state court in discrimination cases.

(Motions for summary judgment are procedural tools that can be used when there are no disputed issues of material fact and therefore the court can decide the case on law

As I’ve previously talked about, two new federal laws protecting pregnant workers and nursing employees are now in effect (with the protections for pregnant workers taking effect on June 27, 2023).

I want to use this post to talk about: the implications for employers in states like Connecticut that already have protections under state law