Are you one of those people who thinks two is better than one? I know I am.

So, with that in mind, I’m pleased to announce that my lawfirm, Shipman & Goodwin has launched a new labor & employment law blog called “Employment Law Letter”.  The firm’s blog is an extension of the firm’s long-standing newsletter led, most recently, by my partner Brian Clemow.

And when I mean long-standing, I mean 40 years worth of production. That’s a publication record worth recognizing!

As announced by my fellow partner, Gabe Jiran, the new blog will also provide frequent and timely articles on a variety of topics as they occur.  In addition, the blog will post announcements of upcoming seminars and events, including my firm’s popular CLE webinar series.

One of the first posts of that blog highlights a CLE program that I’m doing this Tuesday via webinar entitled “Are You at Risk? An In-Depth Look at Workplace Sexual Harassment Prevention and Company Culture.”  It’s not too late to sign up for this FREE webinar here.

Never fear as well – this blog will continue just fine.  We’ll have a little less “guest posts” from my colleagues here now that there’s an additional platform for their posts and I’ll also be cross-posting over there from time to time.  But as with posts about my ABA involvement, etc., this blog will continue to share my perspectives and build from there.

See? Two really IS better than one.  Be sure to subscribe to Employmentlawletter.com today.  

In trying to eliminate sexual harassment in the workplace, how do we go beyond just training?

That is, in essence, the question that my colleagues (Jarad Lucan and Ashley Marshall) and I have been talking about recently.

And, fortunately for you, a topic of a free CLE webinar we are putting on a few weeks.  It’s set for February 13th at 12 p.m.

What we are really looking at is how do you get your company culture and actions in line to try to reduce and eradicate sexual harassment from your workplace?

It does not, obviously, happen overnight.  Perhaps it’s revising your policies. Perhaps it’s adding an ombudsman program if you’re large enough.

Or perhaps it involves encouragement of employee complaints so that you can tackle the issue more directly.

There is no one size fits all to this but it’s an important enough topic (naturally) that we wanted to devote a CLE webinar just to this.

Hope you can join us for this timely topic.

In college, I wanted to write for some of the major newspapers and be on their front page.

Little did I know that my big break would now come years later, as a result of being on the cover of the Hartford Business Journal.  

Wow.

But enough about me.  This blog is about employment law so let’s talk about the article inside the HBJ because it’s definitely worth a read.  

You see, the photo, has little to do with the content.  And the content is what employers should really be paying attention to.

The article is all about the topic of sexual harassment in the workplace, which continues to make headlines each day.

As I noted in the article, we just haven’t seen an increase in lawsuits….yet.

[F]or non-celebrity victims and their employers, the implications are just as dangerous and costly, so prevention is becoming a greater focus for many companies, lawyers say.

“It’s been the topic of conversation,” said Dan Schwartz, an employment lawyer at Hartford law firm Shipman & Goodwin, who has his own blog where he’s been tackling the issue. “It is at a level we haven’t seen in at least 10 to 15 years. There’s always been a steady stream [of inquiries] but we’re getting more calls from clients. It doesn’t mean we’re seeing more legal cases being filed. Lawsuits are a trailing indicator here.”

The article also summarizes things that employers can be doing now, even if there isn’t a sexual harassment complaint made. Update policies. Train managers and supervisors. Continually create an environment where harassment isn’t tolerated.

Each week seemingly brings new issues to the table; employers that can keep their focus on the issue while also maintaining perspective will do well in the long-term to reduce the likelihood of a claim at the workplace.

Did you ever have an employee post a status update from his termination meeting with HR?

I wrote about it a few years ago.  It seemed shocking then, and if anything, we’ve only seemed to be shocked more and more as each new tweet or blog post gets distributed with some outrageous behavior from an employee (or sometimes an employer!).

It used to be that companies would have weeks, if not days, to respond to publicity.  Now, it’s hours or even minutes.

Companies want to preserve their culture and reputation — and their corresponding products and services — more than ever. One misstep can get the online outrage machine going.  heck, even McDonalds’ got into a online snafu when it released (and then promptly sold out of) a unique retro szechuan sauce.

This Thursday, my colleague Jarad Lucan and I will be talking about these issues at our annual Labor & Employment Fall Seminar.  It’s nearly sold out, but you can still see about registering here.

The program session is entitled: Culture Shock: Preserving and Protecting Your Company’s Culture and Reputation in the Digital Age.

And the description is as follows:

In today’s social-media-obsessed digital age, your company and its culture may be put on display for the world to see in mere moments. Whether it’s a Google engineer’s memo claiming gender differences, the sexual harassment scandals at Fox News or the Weinstein Companies, social media rants by employees, or employees participating in hate riots, it has never been more incumbent upon employers to address these issues immediately and appropriately. This session will review state and federal laws and provide employers with steps they can take to create and foster positive company culture and mitigate legal risks.

Of course, it goes without saying that some cultures that have been exposed to the harsh light of social media deserve to be discarded.  Over 20 employees were dismissed at Uber following a detailed sexual harassment investigation into some 215 claims.

Come join us this Thursday and hear about other stories of employees (and employers) behaving badly online and elsewhere.

 

In the course of my litigation cases, I’ve had a good-natured argument at times with a few counsel who represent employees about the mindset of employers.  The argument I’ve heard from them is that employers are too cavalier in firing employees and just go about hiring someone else (someone younger, they argue).

headahbBut what I’ve heard from my clients over the years is something different.

Typically, the decision to fire an employee is tough, made only after a series of internal conversations.  Employees with performance issues weigh on the supervisor’s minds — the struggle between trying to help the employee improve while still making sure that the needs of the business get done.

Mostly they get it right. But firing a poor performer doesn’t typically solve the issues for employers. Rather, they then need to find the RIGHT person to fill that position.

Hiring the right person is hard.   Just the process of searching for that person can sometimes feel like the proverbial needle in the haystack.  Online resumes come in by the dozen and business pressures make it difficult for employers to just find the time to parse through the resumes and interview candidates.

The headaches with hiring have only gotten worse over the last decade as well.

New laws have been put in place that place restrictions on what employers can and cannot ask and when they can ask those questions. And further restrictions on things like non-compete agreements in certain professions make hiring the right person all the more important.

For example, “Ban the Box” is now the law in Connecticut. Have you amended your employment applications to address this issue? Restrictions on the use of credit reports were put in a few years ago. Have you revised your process accordingly? And how can you search social media without running afoul of laws that ban “shoulder surfing”?  Do you give employees an “offer letter” that outlines the terms of their employment as Connecticut law requires?

I’ve talked about some of these things in prior posts, but I’m going to expound upon it further at our firm’s upcoming Labor & Employment Law seminar later this month.  You can register for the program here; space is very limited at this point.

Are there other topics related to hiring that you’d like to hear addressed at the seminar or on the blog? Be sure to post a comment so we can incorporate that in our free presentation.

microphoneWith spring nearly upon us (one can only hope, right?), there are a number of upcoming programs that I’ll be attending or speaking at.

Some are free while others are related to the sponsoring entity.  I hope you can attend one and please feel free to come up to me to chat while we’re there.

  • First up, on March 17th, our firm is putting on our Labor & Employment Spring Seminar focusing on public sector topics.

    Among the topics being explored: Crisis Management; Security in Schools and Workplaces; Title IX Compliance; Trending Topics in Public Sector Negotiations; and, Off-Duty Misconduct.

    Registration is now open and is on first-come, first-served basis.  We expect this to sell out, so please be sure to register today here.

  • On March 23, 2016, my colleague Jarad Lucan and I will be speaking at the CBIA 2016 Human Resources Conference.

    Our topic is one that certainly hot: Namely, Why the NLRB May be Your Biggest Headache in 2016 — Particularly If You Don’t Have a Union.

    Registration is now open for this program as well.

  • And then on May 2, 2016, I will be making a return engagement to the Tri-State SHRM Bi-Annual Conference.

    The event, which is taking place in Rhode Island this year, features a number of tracks. I’ll be kicking things off on Day 1 with a program on Document Retention and Documentation Issues. My colleague Ashley Marshall will be joining me for this interactive and informative presentation.

    Registration is also open for this program now too.

I look forward to seeing you at one of these upcoming programs.

My colleagues at Shipman & Goodwin have, for a lot longer than I have been doing this blog, have been producing the Employment Law Letter recapping some stories you might have missed over each quarter or so.

This week, a new newsletter was released and it touches on several topics of interest.

  • It recaps a Connecticut Supreme Court case that rejected an employee’s claim for lost wages as a result of the Kleen Energy explosion back in 2010.
  • It revisits the NLRB’s cases against a local ambulance company.
  • And it discusses some recent cases regarding FMLA and independent contractors.

If you’re looking for some reading to supplement the blog, I highly recommend the click.

 

lock1Last week, I had the opportunity to speak to the Corporate Compliance Forum for the Connecticut Community Providers Association. My thanks to Gayle Wintjen, General Counsel of Oak Hill, for the invitation to speak.

The topic was a familiar one to this blog — Data Privacy.  In the session, we tackled the new Connecticut law that should be keeping at least some employers up all night figuring things out.

As I said in my talk, employers that have had to adopt HIPAA compliance rules should be in a good shape to get into compliance with Connecticut law. Things like two-factor authentication aren’t nearly as intimidating when you’ve already adopted it for other areas.

Now, the rules don’t need to be adopted by everyone. But those employers who do business with the state of Connecticut are typically covered.

The Privacy and Data Protection Group of my firm put together a FAQ to inform current and potential state contractors of Connecticut’s data privacy and security requirements and to answer the most commonly asked questions about applicable Connecticut law and compliance with it. This article also includes our recommendations for analyzing compliance under applicable Connecticut law and, if necessary, developing a plan to satisfy the pertinent legal requirements.

You can download it free here.

For human resources, I think this is one of the more complicated times to be in HR. Between privacy, discrimination laws, wage & hour laws alone, there are many issues to keep on top of. Make sure data privacy is on your list of things to pay attention to for this year.

And stay tuned for more information on an upcoming program in November.

norwood1After the longest break away from this blog in 8 years (some purposeful, some not — and albeit not very long), it’s time to break from the summer doldrums and start thinking again.

Last week, I had the opportunity to introduce a former law professor of mine — Professor Kimberly Norwood — at my firm’s In Community Event.  Professor Norwood (you never feel comfortable calling a former professor by their first name) spoke eloquently on the way bias — and specifically implicit bias — can play a role in the legal system.

She was outstanding and if you ever get a chance to hear her (and YouTube provides several examples like this one and this one), I would recommend it.

Skillful readers may recall a post a year ago that she wrote here on this blog in the aftermath of the events in Ferguson.   But she is also compelling in her discussions about implicit bias.  In her speech and in an article she wrote last year, she notes that studies show that we ALL have implicit biases.  As she said,

Because there is a clear link between automatic stereotypes and behavior, it is important to untangle automatic associations that can do harm. Part of what social psychologists are doing now is helping us expose our biases
so that we can separate the good from the bad and make more informed and correct decisions.
What does this mean in the workplace? Well, suppose an overweight job candidate comes into your office for a job interview.  Is your implicit bias giving you bad vibes despite the superior credentials and great interview? Studies like this one show a bias in various aspects against overweight.  So, perhaps being aware of this, what then?
Professor Norwood doesn’t suggest any easy answers. And really, how could she? It’s tough to battle against and even when you don’t want those biases to prevail, you may be fighting against the biases of others too.
Now, this is not to suggest that the conclusions regarding implicit biases are settled; there are important legal questions to be decided on this too which I’ll cover in a future post tomorrow.  Whether courts accept this theory and whether it’s scientifically proven remains to be seen.
But that doesn’t mean we should ignore the topic.  Overall, the topic of implicit bias is an important one to keep discussing. These biases don’t make us bad people. But they do require us to continually challenge ourselves too.

templeAs I hinted at the beginning of the year, I expected topics relating to religion to take front and center this year. And certainly, the events of the first few months have supported that.

Today, I’ll be moderating a community forum at my firm, Shipman & Goodwin LLP, entitled “Gotta Have Faith? Religion in the Workplace”.  In this presentation, which is free and open to the public, we’ll talk about the latest legal developments, define what an employer’s obligations to provide accommodations are, address best practices for employers to follow, and share insights into what issues are likely to develop over the next few years.  There will be a Q&A following this panel discussion.

We have a terrific panel lined up of:

  • Steven Sheinberg, General Counsel, Anti-Defamation League
  • Cheryl Sharp, Deputy Director, Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities
  • Gabe Jiran, Partner, Shipman & Goodwin LLP

It starts at 4 p.m. at our Hartford office. For full details, you can view them on Shipman & Goodwin’s website here.

The discussion is part of a our continuing “In Community” forum series, which has produced presentations focusing on a variety of issues facing our workforce and community. Other titles have included:

  • Working With the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Population: A Case Study Under the ADA
  • Race and Cultural Identity in the Working Environment
  • Understanding Gender Identity and Expression and Its Impact in the Workplace
  • Understanding Islam
  • “Not for Sale” – Combating Child Trafficking and Exploitation

We look forward to seeing you there this afternoon.