As Connecticut employers of a certain size know, Connecticut implemented Paid Sick Leave recently which affords employees up to five days off a year.   Now, federal contractors (including those in Connecticut) have another layer to deal with. As my colleague Ashley Marshall explains below, paid sick leave will now be a requirement later this

Somewhat quietly (at least to me), the Connecticut Department of Labor has issued updated guidance regarding compliance with the state’s Paid Sick Leave law.

But employers who have been following the developments in this area — namely the changes to the law by the legislature — won’t be surprised much by the minor changes that

Yesterday, I discussed the carryover rule that requires employers to allow service workers to carry over up to five days of paid sick leave each year.

Not All Issues in Paid Sick Leave Law are Clear

But a loyal blog reader posed the following question to me: Suppose you are

We continue with our series of posts (see prior posts here, here, here, and here) on the new Paid Sick Leave Guidance issued by the Connecticut Department of Labor earlier this month. Today’s post focuses on the “carryover” rules.

Another issue that the Paid Sick Leave addresses is the “carryover” rules —

Last week, I touched on a few aspects of the new Paid Sick Leave Guidance that was released by the Connecticut Department of Labor. (For prior posts, see here, here and here.) Today, I continue to discuss the guidance with a look at when service workers can start using accumulated paid sick leave.

This is the second in a series of posts on the new Paid Sick Leave Guidance from the Connecticut Department of Labor.

Back in June, I discussed who is a “service worker” under the new Paid Sick Leave law.  It is a detailed list that  includes butchers and bakers but not candlestick makers.

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When I reviewed the Paid Sick Leave Guidance released Friday by the Connecticut Department of Labor, I happened to be in Chicago for the day.  And where should I pass by? But Harry Caray’s.

The renowned Cubs broadcaster’s catchphrase was “Holy Cow!” And that phrase was stuck in my head for the weekend.

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