Late yesterday, various press reports signaled what could be the beginning of the end for 2011 Department of Labor guidance that had greatly expanded legal claims against restaurants.

The 2011 rule barred businesses (mainly restaurants) from including nontipped workers in their tip pools.  That practice – if done involuntarily – then entitles the servers or

So, a couple of months back, I talked about how separation agreements for small employers might not be covered by the federal law that covers such agreements.

After all, since the Age Discrimination in Employment Act only applied to employers that have 20 or more employees, the requirements for a “knowing and voluntary waiver”

Continuing his posts on wellness programs, my colleague Marc Herman fills us in on what’s the latest.  

hermanI return today with the second part of a two-part post on wellness programs.

Reference to my prior post is not to be braggadocious, but to remind you that both posts ought be read in tandem. 

Throw out the release?

The situation is a common one.

  • Employer terminates the employment of an employee.
  • Employer provides a severance agreement with its signature already affixed. 
  • Employee signs it and returns the agreement to the employer.
  • Employer, likely reviewing just the signature, pays the severance.

But here’s where things get

We had another great turnout last week  for my firm’s seminar on labor & employment law.  Many of the topics would be familiar to avid blog readers, but there were three interesting points that I haven’t talked much about that I thought were also notable.

1.  In September, the IRS announced a Voluntary Classification Settlement