After releasing the reopening guidelines for businesses earlier this week, the state has updated its website to include a new online certification that employers must complete before reopening the physical workplace.

You can find the reopening certification here.

As the website indicates:

Business [sic] must self-certify and commit to comply with the Sector Rules

“Come out to the coast, we’ll get together, have a few laughs”.  

Sounds like a plan for reopening businesses in Connecticut next week, right?

Well, that quote is from Bruce Willis’s character in one of my favorite movies, Die Hard. It might also be in peril if you are the same age as Bruce Willis

Updated 10:15a, May 9, 2020

Late Friday afternoon, Governor Lamont announced that Phase I reopenings will occur as soon as May 20, 2020.  These will include “non-essential” offices that had been closed, restaurants, retail stores and hair salons.  Early on Saturday, we also got all the detailed rules that will need to be met to

Employers that have been receiving loans under the Paycheck Protection Program from the CARES Act have a lot to think about to make sure that the loan is forgiven.

One key aspect is that the borrower/employer must spend 75 percent of the loan proceeds on payroll.

That becomes challenging when employees have been furloughed or

Today (April 30th) was filled with more news for employers and, for the first time in a while, some of it was hopeful.

Governor Ned Lamont gave the broad outline of a plan to reopen the state (as I predicted early this morning) though the plan’s details depend on control of the pandemic.

We are still “a few weeks” away from the time when Connecticut starts to relax the “Stay Safe. Stay Home” requirements.  (Officially, the rules are set to expire on May 20, 2020 and Governor Lamont has indicated that some businesses will reopen then.) But, beyond the recommendations of the Reopen Connecticut Advisory Board, which

The United States Department of Labor recently updated its guidance on the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (EPSLA) and Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (FMLA+).

My colleagues at Shipman & Goodwin recapped the new guidance here.

One of the key takeaways from is that under the USDOL’s prior guidance and regulations, it

Three months ago, on January 22, 2020, when I uploaded my first coronavirus pandemic post (and being one of the first law blogs to post about it substantively), a few people asked me why I already writing about this.

In part, it was because I had been listening to Dr. Michael Osterholm, the director

Let’s face it: Trying to keep up with all the pandemic-related employment rules released by the state only to see them modified again and again, is challenging to say the least.

And yet, the Safe Workplace Rules for Essential Employers have been modified yet again Tuesday night by the Department of Economic and Community Development,

Yesterday, my colleague Peter Murphy and I set out to write a summary of one of Connecticut’s quiet success stories during this pandemic — the Shared Work program from the Connecticut Department of Labor.

You can find the entire article here.

What is this little program that has served an outsized role the last few