The last time that I spoke with Plaintiff’s attorney Nina Pirrotti, the pandemic was just beginning and we were just getting used to our home offices. Now, 10 weeks later, the abnormal has become normal.  My business attire has gotten a bit more casual and my office a bit more organized.

But it seemed a

Today (April 30th) was filled with more news for employers and, for the first time in a while, some of it was hopeful.

Governor Ned Lamont gave the broad outline of a plan to reopen the state (as I predicted early this morning) though the plan’s details depend on control of the pandemic.

What a long drive the last four weeks have been. Today marks officially marks four weeks for me working from home.

That’s an anniversary that I really didn’t want to celebrate. Sometimes it feels like the road back to “normal” is a long way off.

And perhaps more ominously, Governor Lamont yesterday indicated that he

This morning, my firm put out an urgent alert regarding what businesses need to know about Executive Order 7H over the weekend.  My department’s collective guidance is included in that alert so I recommend it highly to you all.

You can find all of our alerts here.

The following is a portion of the alert

The news late Friday was not unexpected. The Governor is shutting down the offices of non-essential businesses including non-profits.

But if I had told you two weeks ago that Connecticut would be issuing an order telling non-essential businesses that their offices would have to close, I’m not sure I would’ve had many believers.

And yet,

Monday, March 16th was brutal.

I kept using that word over and over in conversations with employers who are watching their entire business disappear overnight.

Brutal.

Layoffs — at a scale that I think is difficult to comprehend — are sweeping through Connecticut businesses.

Restaurants? Closed (except for takeout or delivery).

Gyms? Closed.

Movie theaters?

USDOL Headquarters in DC
USDOL Headquarters in DC

Over the years in the employment law “blawgosphere” (isn’t there a better term by now?), I’ve had the pleasure of meeting with and conferring with several other attorneys who blog. One of those is Jeff Nowak, whose FMLA Insights blog has become a go-to place on all

A new case out of the Second Circuit answers a question that has perplexed employers: How can an employer defend itself from an employment discrimination claim when the person who made the decision becomes “unavailable?” 

(“Unavailable” can take many meanings such as, the witness is out of the country, but in many cases it means