We made it halfway through 2020.

I know it FEELS as if it should be December, but just think how long March was!

A lot has changed since the start of the pandemic.  But over the last few weeks, I’ve been hearing from employers wondering where things stand right now. What’s changed? What still

As employers start to return employees to the physical workplace, new issues keep arising daily.  Here’s a common scenario:

Employee X has been on furlough since late March and collecting more on unemployment than if he had been employed, thanks to the extra $600 weekly payment.

Employer now asks Employee to return to work.  Although

As if the pandemic weren’t disorienting enough, the rules and guidance surrounding unemployment compensation feels as if it keeps changing too.

While that’s not entirely accurate — Connecticut’s rules are basically unchanged though some of the application of those rules have been tweaked — the new CARES Act has added a layer of complexity that

Suppose your company has an incentive bonus plan that bases a bonus on the specific work done during a calendar year.  Bonus payments are made 90 days after the end of the calendar year on an “Award payment date.”

But your bonus plan has an important provision.  That provision states that “Participants must be employed

In a last minute notice and delay, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services announced that it is postponing, until April 3, 2009, the implementation of a new I-9 form and a revised list of acceptable documents to determine employment eligibility.  (For background, you can find my most recent post on the form here.)

The

Since my original post on the subject of Executive Order 12989 yesterday (and the sweeping effects it will have for all federal contractors), others have also added their comments to the subject. Among some of the notable posts:

The brand-new Florida Employment Law Blog (run by my former colleague Richard Tuschman — congrats, Richard!) predicts negative

Most people think that changes to the laws or the way companies conduct business can only happen through the legislative changes.  But an Executive Order effective this week reminds us of the power of Executive Branch.   

Effective immediately, all federal contractors must now agree to use E-Verify, an Internet-based system operated by U.S. government, to electronically verify

The Employee Benefits blog has a terrific post this week explaining the "Gross Misconduct" rule for COBRA Coverage.

For those unfamiliar with the lingo, The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) (among other aspects) describes rights that employees have to continue their health insurance after their employment as been terminated (and for some other reasons