Human Resources (HR) Compliance

Last night, I had the opportunity (again) to sit on a panel discussion sponsored by the Accelerator for Biosciences in Connecticut (ABCT) to talk about operational challenges for new companies and the issues associated with hiring.

ABCT is one of those success stories in Connecticut that should get more press than it does.  It’s

Last week, I covered some of the basics to think about as the coronavirus continues to spread.  Jon Hyman has a post today about whether the ADA might apply to the situation.

But in Connecticut, there’s another case that employers ought to be thinking about now.  It dates back to the first Gulf War in

Back in 2009, it was hard not to miss press coverage of the H1N1 virus.  In fact, I wrote a series of posts about how employers could prepare for a possible pandemic while still complying with employment laws.

Flash forward to now, and press reports are coming out daily about a new (novel) coronavirus

As the decade comes to a close, a time traveler from 2009 might be surprised to see how rapidly laws on marijuana have changed.  Last night’s Democratic Debate even featured a heated discussion about legalizing marijuana.

But let’s imagine that this traveler is from Human Resources. The laws regarding medical marijuana are head-spinning; these laws

First off, let me dispense with the elephant in the room — Yes, the show “Survivor” is still on the air and yes, I haven’t missed any of the 39 seasons of it.

In fact, I shared lessons that employers could learn from Survivor way back in 2010.

Last week’s episode of Survivor, however, brought far more reality than most would think a “reality show” could or should bring.

There’s a lot of nuance to the episode that a short blog post can’t get into (though this podcast by Rob Cesterino gives it a try), but the show’s episode revolved around legitimate sexual harassment claims, using harassment claims for nefarious purposes, and bystander syndrome.

And it was ugly. Really ugly.

Why?  Here are a few things that stood out to me from an employment perspective:

First, a female player (Kellee) complained to a producer that another male player (Dan) was a little too “touchy” and made her feel uncomfortable. To be sure, there was plenty of video evidence to back her up.   The male player was given a “warning” and play continued.  But here’s the thing: The female player never knew that a warning was issued and Dan worked with others to get Kellee voted out of the game immediately thereafter.  Not telling the complainant what was going on with her complaint is just one of the ways the producers seem to have mishandled things.


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Last Friday, I had the opportunity to talk about Artificial Intelligence in the Workplace at the CBIA’s HR Conference.  There was a lot to cover in our discussion and a lot of takeaways too.

For those in Human Resources or in-house lawyers reviewing a company’s potential use of AI in the workplace, here are three

Somewhere, some employer might be thinking: Hey, why don’t I make employees sign a promissory note to pay me back if they leave before six months! That would be a great idea!

It would also be against the law.

Thus, the next installment of the Employment Law Checklist Project #emplawchecklist.  The law is set forth

As I noted last week, I’l be talking at CBIA’s Employment Law Conference on the topic of “Artificial Intelligence & Analytics for HR: Recruiting, Retention & Engagement” next month.

Joining me on the panel is Doug Smith, the SVP Client Delivery at Tallan, which has offices in the Greater Hartford area.  I thought it might