What do you think of masks?

Strangely, it seems a loaded question of late.  How masks became a political hot potato is something that historians will debate.

Yesterday, Connecticut tried out a new slogan encouraging common-sense use of masks. The new slogan? “If you have to ask, wear a mask”.

But that’s not the full

Memorial Day Weekend, in addition to a time of reflection and observance, is also a time when many of us look at our summer plans and figure out the next three months.

But like many of you, our summer plans have been cancelled. Kids aren’t going to camp. We’re not going on a trip. Even

“Let’s engage in a Halloween-type party where everybody would be having sex.”

Or perhaps, “So, are you going to wear a bikini for your Halloween costume?”

What is it about Halloween that brings out the creep factor in the workplace?

The first quote is from a real district court case earlier this year which documented

bbolSo, you remember February 2009, right?

We were all aflutter over Liam Neeson in Taken (ok, I still haven’t seen it).  And we were listening to “My Life Would Suck Without You” by Kelly Clarkson (still a good song.)

And I had a Blackberry Bold and loved it. (I know; even lawyers can plead temporary

Well, it’s official.  Connecticut is under a Blizzard Warning as of Sunday afternoon.

This is, of course, nothing new for employers in the state. We’ve had more than our fair share of big “monster” storms. If you’ve been following this blog for some time, you’ll have read more than your share of blog posts

Updated: August 28, 2011 – As of mid-morning, more than 40 percent of the state is without power, making this storm the highest power outage in state history.  Widespread office closures are expected for Monday and early this week.

It’s the (relatively) calm before the storm on Saturday night.  Hurricane Irene is definitely coming.

But

The Connecticut Bar Association’s Labor & Employment Section sponsored an informal breakfast with NLRB (Region 34) Regional Director Jonathan Kreisberg earlier today to talk about various issues in the labor arena. (Also in attendance were John Cotter, Deputy Regional Director and Terri Craig, Supervisory Attorney). 

It was a terrific session with lots of substantive and

In implementing the budget agreement today, the Connecticut General Assembly approved of significant changes for the CHRO – changes that will ultimately lead to the creation of a new Office of Administrative Hearings. The bill now goes to the Governor; her signature is expected.

Here are the highlights, courtesy of the Office of Legislative Research:

Training for CHRO Members

The bill requires each member of Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities (CHRO) to receive at least 10 hours of introductory training within two months of his or her appointment and before voting on any CHRO matter. A member who does not comply with this requirement within six months of his or her appointment is considered to have resigned from the commission. Each year thereafter, the member must receive five hours of follow-up training.

Reduction in Human Rights Referees

The bill reduces the number of human rights referees over the next approximately two years. On the date the bill passes, the number is reduced from seven to five. They serve until (1) the term they were appointed to fill expires or July 1, 2011, whichever is earlier, and (2) a successor is appointed and qualified. The governor fills any vacancies with the advice and consent of the General Assembly to serve until July 1, 2011.

Beginning July 1, 2011, the number of referees is reduced from five to three. Just as under current law, the governor appoints them with the advice and consent of the General Assembly to serve a three-year term.

The governor may remove any of the referees for cause.

Create Task Force for Department of Administrative Hearings

The bill establishes a 24-member task force to develop recommendations for establishing within the CHRO a Division of Administrative Hearings that would conduct impartial hearings on contested cases brought by or before the departments of Children and Families, Transportation, and Motor Vehicles; CHRO; and the Board of Firearms Permit Examiners.  Among the people: an attorney selected by the Connecticut Bar Association


Continue Reading Legislature Approves Training for CHRO Members; Reduces Number of Human Rights Referees & Establishes Hearing Task Force