Back in October, I provided a preliminary assessment of what a COVID-19 vaccine might mean for employers.  But as I noted back then, the EEOC’s guidance was not yet updated.

Now, the EEOC has finally provided an update of sorts for employers.

In doing so, the new guidance makes plain what many of us suspected

At his press conference on Monday afternoon, Governor Lamont previewed a new set of changes to the Sector Rules that businesses have been operating under. These changes rollback some of the openings under Phase 3, and Lamont has called this new version “Phase 2.1”.

We’re still awaiting all the details this week; the changes are

Late last week, Governor Lamont announced plans to move into the long-awaited plan to reopening businesses in Phase 3.

The exact timing is still to be worked out but the target date is October 8, 2020.

Phase 3 will ease some of the capacity limits but we’re still awaiting details in specific sector rules that

One of the quirks of discrimination law in Connecticut concerns sexual orientation.  Back in 1991, the General Assembly passed a wide-ranging bill that added sexual orientation as one of the protected classes that employers could not base decisions on.

Sort of.

Rather than add sexual orientation to the key employment law statute that bars discrimination

On “Survivor”, one of my favorite broadcast TV shows (or, as my YouTube/Netflix watching teens might say — “what’s that?”) the notion of “immunity” plays a central role in the outcome of an episode.

And in a decision released last week by the Connecticut Supreme Court, whether or not to grant immunity again plays a

My colleague, Gary Starr, returns this morning with a post on a recent case that has implications for employers nationwide.

You wouldn’t think that fingerprinting would be brought into the world of religious accommodations.

After all, the importance of background checks cannot be denied, particularly when the prospective employee is going to work with children

The long-awaited EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch case was released by the U.S. Supreme Court this morning, reversing the Tenth Circuit’s decision. You can download it here.

For anyone following the case, the decision shouldn’t come as a big surprise.  I’ve talked about the case before here and here.

The main holding of the case

In the wake of the United States Supreme Court’s ruling in the Hobby Lobby case, holding that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act provides protection to closely held corporations to refuse, for religious reasons, to provide birth control methods and services to employees under the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive mandate, the issue of accommodating an employee’s

Over the past month, after the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision, much has been made in the press about how it is unprecedented for the court to consider a company’s religious beliefs in making its decisions.

The issue of taking into account a corporation’s religious belief in the workplace has been also catapulted to