Now that Thanksgiving is in the past, it’s time to look forward to the future.

Well, not before getting a recap of everything that transpired in employment law in the last year. Or at least everything that we can fit in an hour long seminar.

The webinar that broke attendance records last year is back again on December 4, 2018 at noon ET.

This year, five employment law bloggers are presenting the “Best-Ever Year-End Employment Law Review that Five Employment Law Bloggers Have Ever Presented” webinar.  Registration is just $25 and it’s eligible for CLE/SHRM/HRCI credit.

All that is needed is to sign up here. 

The presenters this year are:

  • Robin Shea, Constangy, Brooks, Smith & Prophete
  • Kate Bischoff, tHRive Law & Consulting
  • Jon Hyman, Meyers Roman
  • Eric Meyer, FisherBroyles
  • Jeff Nowak, Franczek Radelet
  • Daniel Schwartz, Shipman & Goodwin

Among the topics that you can surely expect to hear about: #MeToo, LGBT discrimination, Data Privacy and Security, Wage & Hour issues, and FMLA.

Be sure to sign up; it promises to be the best ever. (At least until next year.)

In trying to eliminate sexual harassment in the workplace, how do we go beyond just training?

That is, in essence, the question that my colleagues (Jarad Lucan and Ashley Marshall) and I have been talking about recently.

And, fortunately for you, a topic of a free CLE webinar we are putting on a few weeks.  It’s set for February 13th at 12 p.m.

What we are really looking at is how do you get your company culture and actions in line to try to reduce and eradicate sexual harassment from your workplace?

It does not, obviously, happen overnight.  Perhaps it’s revising your policies. Perhaps it’s adding an ombudsman program if you’re large enough.

Or perhaps it involves encouragement of employee complaints so that you can tackle the issue more directly.

There is no one size fits all to this but it’s an important enough topic (naturally) that we wanted to devote a CLE webinar just to this.

Hope you can join us for this timely topic.

Are you looking for something new to end the year with?

Then I have two quick links to share with you this morning.

First, on December 7 from noon to 1 pm (ET, of course), I, along with Eric Meyer (The Employer Handbook Blog), Jeff Nowak (FMLA Insights), Jon Hyman (Ohio Employer’s Law Blog), Robin Shea (Employment & Labor Insider), and our fearless moderator, Suzanne Lucas (Evil HR Lady) will present The 2017 Employment Law Year in Review.

The event is free, but space is limited. Register now for our one-hour recap of all the big employment-law and HR-compliance news of 2017, along with some practical tips to help you prepare your workplace for 2018.

Click here to register:  https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5767568894289723906

Second, I’ve gotten an early listen to a brand-new podcast, entitled “Hostile Work Environment.” Set up by two employment lawyers who have a great sense of humor and a terrific ability to tell a story, the podcast shares various cases with facts that are too fantastic to make up.

You can download it at all the usual podcast locations. Worth a listen if you’re an HR type or employment lawyer.

file9281249337561Tomorrow, I’ll be part of a webinar produced by the American Bar Association on reasonable accommodations under the ADA.  You can still sign up here.

The topic page for the webinar gives a fairly concise summary:

A reasonable accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is any modification or adjustment to a job or the work environment that will enable a qualified applicant or employee with a disability to participate in the application process or to perform essential job functions. Leave can be a reasonable accommodation if it does not constitute an undue hardship on the employer. Our panel of experts will discuss what obligations employers have to provide leave as a reasonable accommodation under the ADA, in light of recent case law and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s May 2016 guidance.

The other speakers on the panel are terrific. Lori Ecker is a Plaintiff’s attorney from Chicago; we’ve worked together in the past on ABA issues and she’ll bring a valuable perspective.  Shannon Rennert is a senior staff attorney with the EEOC who has been on top of these issues for years, even issuing letters on the subject.    Janine Martin moderates.

Among the particulars that we will discuss are such tricky topics such as “maximum leave” policies, and unpaid leave as a reasonable accommodation.  I hope you’ll join us.

With the new federal overtime rules going into effect later this year, I thought it would be useful to talk about in a free webinar.

And apparently, many of you think it would be useful too because in the 48 hours that we’ve opened up the signups to our webinar, we already have a record-breaking number of signups.

worker3But because it’s online, we have room for more.  So consider this your invite to attend a free webinar on June 7th from noon to 1 p.m. EDT.

Topics will include:

  • Overview of the new federal overtime rule
  • Comparison with Connecticut’s existing (and unchanged) wage and hour rules
  • Tips on how to comply with both state and federal law
  • Discussion of common scenarios arising under the new law

I know there’s a lot of anxiety about these rules, but I hope this webinar can put a smile to your face and ease some of your concerns.

If not, then watch the James Corden version of the “Chewbacca Mom” meme.    If that doesn’t put a smile to your face, I’m not sure the webinar is going to help.

campSo “bear” with me on this one.

Today is Yogi Berra’s 90th birthday. The Yankee great is famous for not only his play as a baseball player but also for his sayings, such as “Half the lies they tell about me aren’t true.”

He was so popular he was said to inspire the name of Yogi Bear, a popular cartoon character who lived in Jellystone Park. And what did he like saying? He was “smarter than the average bear!”

But here’s where we come full circle: Jellystone Parks are now a real-life camp/resort too!

And that brings me to today’s topic: Camps.  (I realize that’s a long way to go for this introduction, but so be it.)

Tomorrow, my partners Linda Yoder and Leander Dolphin present a webinar entitled: “Top Tips for Accommodations under the ADA – Who’s Ready for Summer Camp?”

Indeed, with summer just around the corner, summer camps and youth services providers are making preparations for the fast-approaching camp season. This webinar will discuss the Americans with Disabilities Act’s (ADA) application to camp and other youth programs, and a review of top tips to consider, including accommodations, modifications of policies and procedures, provision of auxiliary aids, and safety concerns.

The webinar will cover frequently asked questions such as:

  • Who is considered “disabled” under the ADA?
  • Is our summer camp or youth services program required to comply with the ADA?
  • How do we determine if our organization’s programs, buildings and grounds are ADA accessible?
  • How do we respond to requests for accommodation?
  • Are we required to modify policies and procedures?
  • How do we determine whether an accommodation is reasonable?
  • What if there are competing and conflicting requests for accommodation?
  • How do we respond to safety concerns?
  • What steps can we take to ensure that our contracts protect us from liability or other concerns?

It’s scheduled for 1p Eastern Time. To sign up, you can click here.

And lest you think you can’t learn a lot from a webinar, remember this quote from Yogi Berra: “You Can Observe a Lot By Just Watching.”

 

 

With apologies (credit?) to Randy Newman, you’ve got a friend in me.  Or at least an online “friend.”  It’s better than having enemies, right?

Regardless, you’re cordially invited to join me and others for another Pullman & Comley, LLC webinar on employment law. 

I’ll be leading the charge this time around with this webinar entitled: “With ‘Friends’ Like These: Where Do We Go From Here on Social Media.”

It is scheduled to be held on May 9th from 1-2p ET.  And did I mention it was free?

This hour-long program will tackle the very latest: from the developments at the NLRB to new laws about asking for social media passwords from job applicants and everything in between.  We’ll take your questions as well.

For more on the program and to sign up (and please do sign up before it fills up virtually), you can click here or here

“See” you on May 9th. 

(And since you no doubt have the Toy Story song in your head, I’ll include an easy link below.)

Our monthly free monthly webinar series continues on Wednesday, December 8th at noon EST with a unique program on whether employers can adopt English-only rules.  You can register here to join us.  

This should be a terrific one-hour program that you can listen to during your lunch hour.  Even if you’re not considering adopting formal rules, sometimes these types of policies can get passed down informally.  Two of my colleagues, Rick Robinson and Megan Youngling Carannante will address the group; Rick obtained a favorable result for a client in one such case and we will be able to answer questions during the session.  

The program will review appellate decisions on the subject and the history of legislative and administrative developments.  The goals of the program are to equip practitioners and in-house counsel with the ability to answer their clients when they ask, “Are English- Only Rules legal?” and to identify the strategies they must follow when their clients say, “I want to fight to keep my rule.”  

Even pop culture is getting into the act.  A new song, "We No Speak Americano" has quickly become a favorite in the United States.  There are a few spots remaining for tomorrow’s program.  Don’t miss out.  

After a brief hiatus, our free monthly webinar series is back.  On November 3, 2010 (from 12-1 p.m. EDT), my colleagues Jonathan Orleans and Tiffany Kouri will address two hot topics in employment law:

  1. State and federal authorities are focusing attention on the distinction between employees and independent contractors. Misclassification can expose employers to liability for employee benefits, tax penalties and even criminal prosecution. Tiffany and Jon will provide some practical clues to employers to avoid these issues.
  2. Recent court decisions have addressed, if not entirely clarified, the question of when bonuses count as wages. Mistakes made in the treatment of bonuses can expose employers to liability for liquidated damages and attorney fees.  Jon and Tiffany will address how employers can set up their bonus programs without creating unnecessary legal risks.

Registration is free and you can sign up here. 

Following this program, we will have our next webinar on Wednesday November 17th. Look for details on that program soon. 

Our webinar on employee misclassification and FLSA exemptions is set for noon today. There’s still time to register for this free webinar here (we hope to post the webinar audio later today). 

If you can’t make it (or even if you can), the following is a link to the webinar materials. In the webinar, we will not be going over these in all their detail but we thought you might find it useful as a resource.

My thanks to my colleague Joshua Hawks-Ladds who is the main presenter of this webinar and has put the materials together.